Remember the Olympics?

The 2012 London Olympics wrapped up last week.  While most casual sports fans have already recovered from their small case of Olympic fever, hardcore sports fanatics may still be nursing their Olympics hangover.  Don’t despair — as usual, the library has you covered.  These Olympics-related books and DVDs should help you feel better in no time.

Otl Aicher was an influential German designer, as this collection of his work shows.  The book includes a fascinating chapter on Aicher’s groundbreaking design work for the ill-fated 1972 Munich Olympics.  From posters to signage to color schemes, Aicher’s designs  complement each other and create an overall visual identity.  The pictograms he created to represent events would later become the basis of commonly-used symbols, such as male/female restrooms, “no swimming”, etc.

A single photograph can truly do wonders to capture the pure emotions of the Olympic Games.  Andy Steel’s collection of sports and action photography is excellent.  It includes a short bio and interview with each photographer as well as full-page color images.  While all of the shots in this book are stunning, check out the work of Ezra Shaw and Tom Jenkins to see great Olympic images from recent years.

Admittedly, some of us were watching the London Olympics in hopes of catching a glimpse of Britain’s biggest fashion celebrities in the stands.  For those fans, Anglomania is a great book.  It’s a collection of photos from the Metropolitan Museum of Art that takes a creative approach to showing how British fashion has changed over the past few centuries.  Modern fashion pieces are displayed in time period-themed rooms, marking the similarities and differences in culture and fashion.  It’s a must for any fan of British fashion.

At its core, the Olympics are a display of the marvelous feats the human body is capable of performing.  The National Geographic special Incredible Human Machine explores the science of how an athlete’s body is able to accomplish what they do, as well as the amazing things our bodies do for us regular folks on a daily basis.  As it turns out, the act of breathing is just as fascinating as running a triathalon, and way less tiring.

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